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Gingelly Oil / Sesame Oil –Culinary and Medicinal Use

History

The scientific name of sesame is Sesamum indicum (‘indicum’ means ‘from India’) and the usage of this seed dates back to 3,000 BC. Sesame oil is one of the first edible oils to be extracted and used by human beings. One can find a mention of the medicinal values in the Egyptian book of medicine – “Papyrus Ebers” written in 1,550 BC. 

In one of the earliest documented facts, Sesame seeds were found at the Indus Valley civilization site of Harappa within the levels of mound F between 2700 B.C. and 1900 B.C. Similarly, such seeds were discovered at Miri Qalat in Balochistan too. Sesame seeds were first cultivated in India over 5,000 years ago. It eventually spread to the Middle East and East Asian territories.

Uses of Sesame oil varied from region to region. E.g., While Babylonians used this oil to make perfumes, Egyptians used it to make medicines and for ceremonial purification purposes. 

Role of Sesame seeds/Oil in Vedas and other scriptures

Sesame seed is associated with Lord Vishnu and Sesame oil (Gingelly oil) is associated with his consort Maha Lakshmi. Vedic literature such as Boudayana Dharmasutra and Grhya Sutra, Jaiminiya Grhya Sutra. There are mentions of Sesame in Garuda Purana, Manu Smriti amongst others. 

Specifically, in Garuda Purana, it is clearly mentioned to lay a dead body spread on a layer of Darba grass and black sesame on the ground which has been purified with a coat of diluted cow dung. 

Storage of cold pressed sesame oil in huge jars has a mention in the Atharva Veda. Anointing with sesame oil is widely discussed in Sankhayana Aranyaka. Yajur Veda also has references to it. Volumes have been discussed in Sangam a “Tamil Literature about 2000 years ago

Read more at:

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/why-sesame-is-standard-oil-for-cooking-and-eating/articleshow/26522984.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

Read more at:

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/why-sesame-is-standard-oil-for-cooking-and-eating/articleshow/26522984.cms?utm_source=contentofinterest&utm_medium=text&utm_campaign=cppst

Health Benefits of Cold Pressed Gingelly Oil

According to health experts, sesame is a rich source of vitamins and minerals. Especially during winter it is good to consume sesame oil on a daily basis as it contains calcium, iron, magnesium, phosphorus, manganese, copper, zinc, fibre, thiamine, vitamin B6 and folate which helps in building immunity and protects the human body during adverse weather conditions. This rich source of protein is considered to be one of the purest forms of grains.

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The dense content of copper and antioxidants help relieve pain and swelling associated with arthritis. Cold pressed Gingelly oil is good for Asthma patients too because it contains magnesium in it which gives relief against all sorts of respiratory diseases. This oil is directly applied on skin to improve texture and elasticity. 

Use of Gingelly Oil in all parts of India

Unlike other cooking oils, cold pressed sesame/gingelly oil is not restricted to any particular region. This is widely used all throughout India throughout the year.

The crop is grown in almost all parts of the country. More than 85% production of sesame comes from West BengalMadhya Pradesh, Rajasthan, Uttar Pradesh, Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh, and Telangana

Different names of Sesame seeds in India.

Til in Hindi, Punjabi, Assamese, Bengali, Marathi,

Tal in Gujarati,

Nuvvulu/Manchi Nuvvulu  in Telugu,

Ell in Tamil, Malayalam,

Ellu in Kannada

Tila/Pitratarpana (Sanskrit) and Rasi (Odia )

How World uses this golden wonder: 

The countries with the highest volumes of sesame oil consumption in 2017 were Tanzania (362K tonnes), Myanmar (333K tonnes), and China (249K tonnes), with a combined 58% share of global consumption. Mozambique, India, Sudan, Japan, South Korea, and Turkey lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 25%.

Sesame oil is most popular in continental Asia, especially in East Asia and the South Indian states of Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, and Tamil Nadu, where its widespread use is similar to that of olive oil in the Mediterranean. East Asian cuisines often use roasted sesame oil for seasoning during cooking, or at the table.

Few famous recipes using Sesame/Gingelly/Til oil 

Melkote Subbanna Puliyogare  

“Authentic Temple Style Food”

The Melkote region is famous for its temples specially Cheluva Narayana Swamy Temple. The place is also known as Thirunarayanapuram. This temple town in the Melkote region of  Karnataka is famous for its Iyengar Puliyogare, tangy and spicy tamarind rice traditionally cooked. 

Ingredients:

  • 1 Big Lemon size Tamarind
  • 2 Cups Cooked Rice
  • ¼ tsp Turmeric Powder
  • 2 tsp Salt Adjust as needed
  • 1 tbsp Grated Jaggery

For Grinding                                                                          

  • 1 tsp Cumin Seeds
  • 1 tbsp Coriander seeds
  • 1 tbsp Whole Urad Dal
  • 1 tsp Peppercorns
  • 7 nos Red Chili
  • 1 tbsp Sesame Seeds
  • 1 tbsp Dry coconut (copra)
  • 1 tbsp Roasted Gram Dal 

 For Tempering   

  • Half Cup Healthy Fibres Cold Pressed Sesame Oil
  • 1 tsp Mustard seeds
  • ½ tsp Asafoetida (Asafetida / Hing)
  • 2 tbsp Peanuts
  • 5 nos Red Chili
  • 1 sprig Curry leaves

Procedure 

  • Take 2 cups of cooked rice in a broad vessel. Spread the cooked rice and allow it to cool off completely.
  • Soak tamarind in 2 cups of hot water for 10 mins. After 10 mins, squeeze and extract the thick juice of tamarind and set aside.
  • Heat a pan. Add cumin seeds and fry till it is dark brown. Take it aside on a plate.
  • In the same pan fry coriander seeds till the seeds become slightly dark brown. Take this aside on the same plate.
  • Next, add urad dal and pepper, fry till dal turns golden brown, and take it aside.
  • Now, add red chili and fry the chili till it puffs up. Take it aside.
  • Then, add sesame seeds and fry till it sputters. Take it aside.
  • Next, add dry coconut and fry till the coconut turns slightly brown.
  • Allow all the above ingredients to cool off completely and grind it in the mixer jar adding roasted gram to the smooth powder. 
  • Heat a heavy-bottomed pan. Add the tamarind extract along with turmeric and salt.
  • Allow the tamarind extract to boiling for 5 mins to get rid of the raw smell of tamarind juice. Add the ground puliyogare spice powder to the boiling tamarind and give a good mix so it gets nicely incorporated with the tamarind juice.
  • Bring this to a thick consistency. Add grated jaggery and give a good mix. Switch off the flame.

For Tempering 

Heat Healthy Fibres Cold Pressed Sesame/Gingelly oil in a pan. Add mustard seed, asafoetida, red chilies, and peanuts and fry till peanuts are slightly brown then add few curry leaves and switch off the flame.

Finishing Touch

Add the tempered ingredients to the puliyogare gojju and give a nice mix.

Add 3-4 tbsp of Puliyogare gojju to the cooked rice. Mix gently without mashing the rice. Add extra gojju for extra punch. Delicious Melkote Iyengar Puliyogare made with Healthy Fibres sesame/gingelly oil is Ready!!

Gujarati Mango Pickle Recipe

Ingredients

  • Raw Mangoes – 1 kg
  • Fenugreek Seeds/Methi  – ¾ cup
  • Mustard Seeds – ¼ cup
  • Red Chilly Powder – ¾ cup
  • Salt – ½ cup
  • Asafoetida/Hing – 2 tsp
  • Turmeric Powder – 2 tblsp
  • Healthy Fibres Cold Pressed Sesame Oil / Gingelly Oil – 3 cups+ 

Preparing Procedure

1. Wash and wipe dry the mangoes. Ensure that it is free from moisture. Cut into small cubes. 

2. Now take this in a large bowl.

3. Take fenugreek and mustard seeds in a blender and crush them lightly. Add this as well to mangoes.

4. Now add in all the other ingredients except oil and mix well.

5. Fill the spiced mangoes in a dry jar.

6. Pour Healthy Fibres cold pressed sesame/gingelly oil till mango pieces are immersed completely.

7. Preserve in an air-tight jar for 15 to 20 days before serving.

Szechuan or Schezwan Sauce –  

The hot and spicy sauce

Widely used in many Indo-Chinese stir-fries, noodles, fried rice, etc.,

Ingredients:

  • 20 dry red chilies – 15 Dried Red chilly and 5 dried Byadgi chilies
  • 4 tablespoons Healthy Fibres  Cold Pressed Sesame oil
  • 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic or 15 small to medium-sized garlic cloves
  • 1 teaspoon finely chopped ginger or 1 inch ginger
  • ¼ cup finely chopped shallots or 1 small onion – finely chopped
  • ½ tablespoon finely chopped celery – optional (skip if you don’t have)
  • ½ cup water – to be added later
  • 2 teaspoons raw sugar or organic unrefined cane sugar or brown sugar – please add as required. For a more sweeter taste, you can even add up to 3 teaspoons of sugar.
  • ¼ to ½ teaspoon black pepper powder or as required
  • ½ teaspoon light soy sauce or as required
  • 1 tablespoon rice vinegar or white vinegar or apple cider vinegar salt as required

Making of Schezwan Sauce

Soak red chilies in water for about half an hour. Grind it to a fine paste and keep it aside. 

  • Heat Healthy Fibres cold pressed sesame/gingelly oil in a frying pan.
  • Lower the heat. Saute finely chopped garlic and ginger till their raw aroma vanishes. Don’t brown them.
  • Add the chopped shallots and then saute them stirring often till translucent on low to medium-low heat.
  • Add the ground red chili paste and stir thoroughly. 
  • Then add the crushed Sichuan pepper and finely chopped celery (if using). Sauté for 1 to 2 minutes more till you see oil releasing from the sides of the sauce.
  • Add ½ cup of water and mix well. Simmer for 2 minutes stirring often on low to medium-low heat.
  • Add salt, sugar, pepper, soy sauce, and vinegar.
  • Stir and continue to cook further for 5 to 6 minutes more on low to medium-low heat.
  • Switch off the heat and set the pan aside. More salt, sugar or pepper could be added as required.
  • Once the sauce cools at room temperature, transfer it in a small jar or bowl. Cover tightly with a lid and refrigerate.
  • Serve schezwan sauce as a condiment with snacks or you can also add in recipes like schezwan fried rice or noodles, vegetable schezwan, or veg balls in hot garlic sauce or schezwan dosa.
  • It stays good for about 2 to 3 weeks in an air-tight container in the refrigerator.

How World uses this golden wonder: 

The countries with the highest volumes of sesame oil consumption in 2017 were Tanzania (362K tonnes), Myanmar (333K tonnes), and China (249K tonnes), with a combined 58% share of global consumption. Mozambique, India, Sudan, Japan, South Korea, and Turkey lagged somewhat behind, together accounting for a further 25%.

Sesame oil is most popular in continental Asia, especially in East Asia and the South Indian states of Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, and Tamil Nadu, where its widespread use is similar to that of olive oil in the Mediterranean. East Asian cuisines often use roasted sesame oil for seasoning during cooking, or at the table.

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